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Aquatic Tourism
Fáilte Ireland Highlights 'Huge Potential' of Marine Tourism
#AQUATIC TOURISM - Water-based activities from kayaking to surfing to diving have a "huge potential" for Irish tourism. http://www.afloat.ie/resources/business/aquatic-tourism That was the message from Fáilte Ireland's Outdoor Adventure and Activity Forum in Westport, Co Mayo this week, The Irish Times…
Take Part in New Survey on Boating Holidays in Ireland
Afloat.ie is looking forward to the results of a new survey on boating holidays in Ireland. http://www.afloat.ie/resources/business/aquatic-tourism/ Fáilte Ireland is looking to hear from anyone who has recently enjoyed a boating holiday in Ireland to learn about their experiences, and…
Entente Cordiale - Glenans Ireland Reunites with France
After a quarter of a century, Glenans Irish Sailing Club has been reunited with its French parent association, writes Bryan Dobson. Well known to generations of Irish dinghy and keel boat sailors, the Glénans sail training bases at Baltimore, Co…
Making a Splash With the Family in Ireland
Watersports holidays at home make the perfect family getaway, according to The Irish Times. The paper recently rounded up some of the best spots for making a splash with the kids – such as surfing, diving and cliff jumping in…
Fun On The Water You May Not Have Tried
This week The Irish Times highlights a host of water-based activities that you may not have tried. From kitesurfing to paddle boarding, urban fishing to SCUBA diving and even moonlight kayaking, there's surely a new experience for everyone from the…
Seaweed Experience in West Cork
Seaweed picking is just one example of many 'green' tourist breaks now available in Ireland, according to The Irish Times. Inchydoney Island Lodge and Spa in West Cork offers a two-night 'seaweed experience' for those looking for a more responsible,…
Marine Sector Could Boost Tourism
Writing in the Irish Examiner yesterday, Donal Hickey points Ireland's tourism authorities towards our abundant marine wildlife as a draw for potential visitors. Hickey makes note of the "multi-million euro industry" built up around Fungie the dolphin in Dingle and…
New Marina Centre for Ballycastle
Work has begun on a new visitor services building at Ballycastle harbour as part of a £7.4 million (€8.6 million) marine tourism project for the nothern part of Ireland and western Scotland. Moyle District Council is one of 20 partners…
South-East's Coast, Rivers Hold Tourism Potential
Tourist anglers spent €89.9 million in Ireland in 2008, a marine leisure conference in Co Waterford heard recently. The importance of angling to the Irish economy was highlighted at the Rising Tide seminar in New Ross, an event focused on…
The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) is running a new course for marine wildlife tour operators in Galway on 27-28 November. The two-day course - at the campus of the Galway-Mayo Institue of Technology in Letterfrack - is intended…
Capital Grant for Dingle Aquarium
The Oceanworld Aquarium in Dingle, Co. Kerry has been approved a capital grant of €100,000 from Údarás na Gaeltacha according to The Sunday Business Post. The funding will be used to develop a polar penguin exhibition centre. The new facility,…
New Cruising Website lists Marinas & Moorings
A new website has been launched to accompany Brian Keane's  book Cruising Ireland - A Guide to Marinas and Mooring Buoys. The book lists details of more than 70 ports and anchorages around Ireland and the website matches the information…
Leaders Charter make move to Dublin
Leaders Charter, a sailing charter company formerly based in Westport, has relocated to Dublin for the 2010 season. The company, run by former Olympic Finn campaigner Aaron O'Grady, has stationed its Hanse 54 Explorer on Dun Laoghaire Marina ready for…
Special Yacht Charter Deals in Croatia
Activity Yachting holidays have some early season Sailing Specials in Croatia. From their base on Murter they will be operating a Flexible Flotilla/Free-Sailing programme during the three weeks from 24th April to 15th May allowing people to start on any…
Winter Sun Sailing Breaks
If you've no plans for a break during the summer itself, Damien Ward of Globe Yachting and Aaron O'Grady of Leaders Charter in Westport have put their heads together and came up with a plan for Aaron's Luxury Charter Yacht,…

Marine Leisure & Aquatic Tourism

Domestic coastal tourism expenditure was approximately €698 million in 2018, while domestic marine tourism generated €381 million.

Activities such as walking/ running along the coast, swimming and beach visitations are among the most popular activities for domestic visitors on both day and overnight trips.

While participation rates in pursuits such as bird and wildlife watching in coastal areas and visiting nature reserves, etc. in coastal areas were lower, these activities did see the highest frequency of both day and overnight trips for those active in these activities. 

According to the National University of Galway (NUIG) research the average expenditure per coastal day trip in 2018 was calculated at €95. The equivalent for coastal overnight trips was €310. The estimated water-based activity expenditure per person per trip across the sample was €56 rising to €73 for the subsample that actually undertake waterbased activities on their coastal visits. The results also indicate that domestic tourists undertake the majority of their marine activities on the West and South coasts of Ireland and that there are notable differences in participation rates across age groupings, social classes and by family makeup.

A domestic tourist is defined in this report as a person who spends at least one night away from home on their trip. Total expenditure by domestic tourists in coastal areas was estimated to be €698 million in 2018, which represents 35% of the total expenditure by domestic tourists (using the broader Fáilte Ireland measure for domestic tourists that includes business trips equating to 10.92 million in total trips and €2,006 million in total revenue).

The marine-related activity expenditure, or what might truly be referred to as domestic marine tourism, is estimated to generate revenue of €381 million with €172 million being spent on water-based activities. Marine tourism makes up an estimated 19% of total domestic tourism expenditure.

Marine Leisure Tourism - FAQ

Coastal tourism refers to land-based and water-based tourism activities taking place on the coast for which the proximity to the sea is a condition including also their respective services. Coastal and Marine Tourism & Leisure are seen as one of the Blue Economy (BE) sectors that can help unlock the potential of multi-use of space at sea by engaging with Blue Growth (BG) sectors such as Aquaculture and Marine Renewable Energy among others.

Sports: sailing, surfing, diving and fishing Heritage: Unesco coastal villages, archaeological sites of interest, biospheres and historical points of interest Arts: coastal museums, art galleries, museums, wrecks Education: Eco-tourism, field courses, NGOs. Food: Seafood restaurants, Seafood festivals

NUI Galway carried out a survey of domestic residents in Ireland in 2019 as part of a survey entitled "Valuing and understanding the dynamics of Ireland's Ocean Economy". The purpose of the household survey was to profile the domestic market for single-day trips (leisure) and overnight trips (tourism) for coastal and marine-related activities in Ireland. The results of the survey are also used to estimate what proportion of an Irish resident's total domestic tourism expenditure is in coastal areas (coastal tourism) and what proportion is spent on undertaking marine-related activities (marine tourism).

The NUI results highlight the important contribution that Ireland's marine and coastal resources make to the leisure experiences of the general population and the importance of the domestic tourism market to local coastal economies. The analysis indicates that domestic coastal tourism expenditure was approximately €698 million in 2018, while domestic marine tourism generated €381 million. Activities such as walking/ running along the coast, swimming and beach visitations are among the most popular activities for domestic visitors on both day and overnight trips. While participation rates in pursuits such as bird and wildlife watching in coastal areas and visiting nature reserves, etc. in coastal areas were lower, these activities did see the highest frequency of both day and overnight trips for those active in these activities. Satisfaction with the available marine-related leisure facilities was also found to be very high across all activities.

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